Sobering reading

Mar
16

Students at the Centre may still be wondering what they want to be journalists for; what they want to do with their skills and knowledge once they leave here. It's a tough choice, and hopefully you will be spoiled for it.  While you're thinking about the good things you do want to do, here is some sobering reading about the harm journalists can do.

Posted By SarahLonsdale read more

Important information regarding work experience

Mar
13

Please be advised that for your nctj portfolios, for any work published in a newspaper/magazine you will be required to supply not only the published article but also a print out of your original, signed by your news editor/editor/chief reporter.

Posted By SarahLonsdale read more

Local news and fine reporting

Mar
13

This morning's Medway Messenger leads on a fine illustration of why local journalism matters.  Alan Watkins' exclusive about the number of staff at Medway council earning in excess of £50k is an example of a diligent reporter and his newspaper holding local government to account.

Posted By TimLuckhurst read more

What future for local papers?

Mar
10

It's been a pretty grim day for publishers of local + regional newspapers with yet more announcements of some quite savage cuts in the industry and the unwelcome news of an independent publisher going into administration. The Kent Messenger Group is not immune and we are in the midst of a proposal to lose some 150 jobs, including those of editorial staff.

Posted By Paul Francis read more

Goodbye newspapers, hello corruption

Mar
07

Goodbye to the Age of Newspapers (Hello to a New Era of Corruption) is the title of an essay by Paul Starr in The New Republic (America's most consistently intelligent political magazine and a must-read for anyone determined to understand life inside the Washington DC beltway). I urge everyone to read it. It is depressing, but erudite and utterly right. A new democratic deficit looms. We journalists must urgently find a way to fill it.

Posted By TimLuckhurst read more

Guernica and the first draft

Mar
06

Students will remember George Steer, the Times correspondent who revealed the bombing of Guernica, from my lectures and seminars about the Spanish Civil War. I know Sarah has introduced you to other examples of his writing. In the Times this morning there is fresh confirmation of the efforts Franco made to deny the truth of Steer's report. 

Posted By TimLuckhurst read more

UNESCO student journalism prize

Mar
05

For anyone who would like to write another essay - or make another audio package (and possibly win £500) what about entering this student journalism prize sponsored by UNESCO on the topic of press freedom?

Posted By Suzanne Franks read more

Harsh realities

Mar
04

Not the most uplifting thing to post on a journalism education site, but this video chronicling the death of a US newspaper after a century and a half is certainly a sign of the times. It's way too long, and a little self-indulgent, but under the circumstances you can't blame its creators, whose first instinct was to report their own demise. Watch the first couple of minutes and then skip to about 16 mins, when the final coup de grace is delivered. I've been in that situation. It's bloody horrible.

Final Edition from Matthew Roberts on Vimeo.

Posted By ianreeves read more

The first CfJ Radio News Challenge

Feb
27

I've posted web versions of the 30-minute radio news programmes produced by two undergraduate teams yesterday. We'll have a full de-briefing session on Monday, but try to listen to them over the weekend to remind yourselves of your moments of glory. And infamy.

Posted By Ian Reeves read more

Interactive masterclass with BBC's Allan Little

Feb
19

This is the first of a series of masterclass sessions with senior journalists visiting the Centre for Journalism, produced as an interactive Flash presentation. BBC World Affairs correspondent Allan Little talks to staff and students about his career reporting from some of the world's most difficult places.

This is an embeddable file. Click the 'share' button on the presentation's main menu to embed it into your own web site or personal blog. Note: Will work best with the most up-to-date version of the free Quicktime player, available here

Posted By ianreeves read more

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