How to resign

Nov
07

Adam Smith, a journalist from Trinity Mirror's Birmingham Post & Mail, uses the unusual medium of Youtube to hand in his resignation.

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Video assignment: where you need to be

Nov
06

For all of you working on your video news package assignment, I thought it might be worth giving you some guidance on where you need to be in the process. By the start of the teaching session on Monday you ideally should have nailed your interviews and know what your story is. Finding the focus of your story is the key now. There won't be a lot of point in spending time getting GVs until you've done this - they can always be added later. If you haven't got that focus yet, come and see me or Richard and we'll be happy to give some guidance on where to look and who to call.

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Blears on Blogging

Nov
05

Without fanfare or comment I draw to your attention this piece by New Labour's favourite uber-Blairite, Hazel Blears. It is an edited version of a speech she will make to the Hansard Society. Ever wondered why journalists have such a long established tradition of resisting state regulation? Isn't Hazel marvellous?     

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Election results - live on CfJ!

Nov
04

With the clock ticking before the first polls close on the east coast, I thought I'd test out some of the whizzy online interactive gizmos that various sites are offering as part of their election coverage. Some of them even offer gadgets you can embed into your own blog posts. Such as this one...

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New York Times's interactive election

Nov
04

If anybody's planning to stay up/get up early to check on progress in the election across the pond, it might be worth checking out the New York Times's various interactive gizmos - including a pop-up election dashboard, and video updates every half hour from the NYT newsroom.

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The 24-minute news cycle

Nov
03

The 2008 Presidential Campaign gives Time magazine's James Poniewozik the chance to expound his theory that the 24-hour news cycle is dead. In its place, thanks to digital technology and the 'unofficial media', is the 24-minute news cycle.

"If you follow campaign news, you'll see this cycle in action several times a day, with stories sprouting, blooming and dying like flowers in time-lapse photography," he says.

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Stop the Press...Forever

Oct
31

If radical thinking is the solution to declining newspaper circulations then this proposal from the American Recovering Journalist blog is at the sharpest end of the most acute cutting edge. To secure their futures, suggests Marc Andreesen, newspapers should stop printing paper copies now and force their readers (and avertisers) to appreciate the online product. I think the idea is closer to insanity than radicalism, but perhaps I'm missing a glorious business opportunity.

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Sometimes news has to stew a bit

Oct
31

Here's a nice post from technology journalist Charles Arthur on why news doesn't have to be, well, new. The Brand/Russell broadcast, Arthur points out, should have been cold potatoes by the time the Mail on Sunday picked it up more than a week after it had gone out. Not so, as we have seen. And he gives a neat definition that encapsulates a newspaper law: "News is what the reader doesn’t yet know, but you can persuade them they want to".

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Student grants cut after government 'overspending'

Oct
29

Grants for university students are having to be cut by the government from next year, after they had reportedly made an overspending blunder.

Although poorer students are unlikely to be effected, the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) said they found a financial deficit of £200m.

Despite the DIUS improving student financial grants this year, according to BBC News the upper limit to receive a student grant will be lowered from £60,000 to £50,020 next year.

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