Trouble for citizen journalism pioneer OhMyNews

On the face of it, the news that one of the world's pioneering 'citizen journalism' sites is ending its payments system for contributors could be seen as good or bad news for the industry. On the one hand, the decision by OhMyNews could be taken as proof that consumers don't particulary value content from what was largely a workforce of enthusiastic volunteers with no formal training in journalism. Best leave it to the professionals, right?

Video journalism map

Press Gazette asked me to take look at the state of video journalism on regional newspaper web sites for a piece in its latest issue. (It ain't pretty, generally speaking - although I can't link to the piece directly because of PG's rather 1990s practice of not posting magazine content on its web site). To tie in with the piece, I've created an interactive Google map designed to highlight some of the good video stuff that's being produced by newspapers around the world.

Christmas blogging

I'd like to keep the site ticking over during the Christmas break, so am proposing a New Labour-style package of measures to stimulate the blogging economy during those bleak, lesson-free weeks. So I'll be offering music vouchers (itunes or an alternative) for the following:

Print assignment coursework

For those of you who missed today's lecture, the assignment briefing for your next piece of assessed coursework is now on the site. Check the convergent journalism section of module notes. If there's anything you're not sure about, then do ask. The deadline is 12noon on Thursday 18 December.

Why subs matter

Following this week's exercise in sub-editing, I discovered this clever tribute to the art from the Washington Post. It's by Pulitzer-winning writer Gene Weingarten, and praises the newspaper industry's copy editors (the US term for subs) by demonstrating the sort of nonsense we might have to read if they didn't exist. See how many of the 57 errors you can pick up.

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Ian Reeves's blog