Heyy guys, let's discuss pregnancy!
The moment when a woman finds out she is pregnant should typically be one of the happiest moments for her as it means bringing a new life into the world. Unfortunately, That is not always the case for new mothers as they are stuck focusing on the economic factors such as thinking if they can afford a child (Children are not cheap!) and the anxiety of not having a stable support system to bring the child into. Although, for most mothers, the feelings of joy and exhilaration come with the idea of pregnancy!
However, for women living in the UK of different backgrounds, black women, in particular, can experience anxiety at the thought of becoming pregnant from factors that are completely not in their control. Such as genetic complications which make it more difficult for a child to be born healthy and neonatal care which means black women receive care from doctors that are below the appropriate level of care a pregnant woman should receive! For Black women, there are also believed to be stereotypes in place that make it more difficult for a safe pregnancy to go ahead.
Did you know Black women in the UK are four times more likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth than white women!
This statistic is extremely unsettling for many Black women as everyone no matter their race should feel safe and secure in the beautiful process of having a baby but awful negligence of duty cases prevent that from happening.
Along with Genetics, Did you know Africans are more prone to Hypertension (High blood pressure), Sickle cell, and Tay - Sachs disease.
This means women have to be cautious of who they have children with and aware of the potential risks that can occur when having children. Pregnant women who experience negligence of duty during their pregnancy and childbirth are also vulnerable as not only can this lack of care affect their unborn/newborn child it can also affect them simply because Black women are not listened to and their pain is ignored.
 
 
 

 

Let's talk about Black Pregnancies in the UK